Red, Black and White Double Triangle Cuff Bracelet

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Finished this last week. Sorry for taking so long to show you. My first photos weren’t that great so I retook them.

This is another one of my creations using open triangles.

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I like making triangles.

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Think I will make another one in different colors. Maybe not as wide as this one.

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More Triangles In Royal Blue and Hot Pink

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This is what I have been working on for about a week. Making one triangle at a time. Taking my time. Can’t rush creativity.

I made the hot pink bracelet exactly like the orange and black one I showed you. But wanted something a bit different for the royal/black one.

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Don’t know if you can see it, but there is beaded fringe along the inverted “V” shape of the first triangle and also along the bottom edge of the last triangle.

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The clasp is a string of round black glass beads that the beaded toggle bar inserts into. Kind of different, huh? And that is exactly what I wanted. Different.

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Earrings have the same round black beads.

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Here’s the pink set.

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These are works-in-progress. Not sure yet where I am going with them.

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How To Make A Beaded Toggle Bar

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Beaded toggle bars are easy to make. Even if you don’t know the peyote stitch that well.

One thing I suggest. Do resist the temptation to continue from your beadwork directly to the toggle bar. Always end your current thread. And start with a fresh thread to connect the toggle bar.

Reasons?

  • you make a mistake on placement and need to undo it
  • bar is too large or too small and you want to remake it
  • need to change the number of beads leading to the bar
  • etc, etc.

If you had continued with the same thread as your beadwork, you could possibly ruin your item trying to make these changes. Been there. Done that.

This is what works for me. And I have tried various combinations of seed beads/rows.

Using 8/0 seed beads, gauge how many you will need. I have tried 14, 16, 18 and 20 seed beads.  Peyote for 4 rows. Meaning when you count the beads at the top and bottom, you count 4.


Instructions for Beaded Toggle Bar

Step 1

String 20 seed beads. I used size 8/0. Add a bead stopper.

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Step 2

Beginning on the end opposite the bead stopper, working upward, start adding beads.

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Continue adding beads/rows until you have 4 beads at the top and 4 beads at the bottom.

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Step 3

Pinch the beadwork together between your fingers. I used a metal clip to illustrate the folding of the beads.

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Step 4

Begin to sew the sides together.

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Zip up the sides by sewing into ONLY the high beads. Those sticking out further. Go from one side to the other, going upward. I like to reinforce the beadwork by going up and down the entire length of the toggle bar with the working thread. Also going up and back down with the tail thread. Try to come out of the same seed bead with both threads. CUT BOTH THREADS.

This is how your beaded toggle bar should look after sewing the sides together.

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Step 5

Once finished, one last thing to do. Insert a piece of inexpensive wire. Artistic Wire, I think mine is called.

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Push it through the toggle bar almost to the end. Cut wire, file any burrs, now push the rest of the way. This extra step strengthens your toggle bar. The wire is in tight enough, no need to worry about it coming out. (You could sew a tiny 11/0 seed bead on the ends.)

Step 6

Connect toggle bar to your beadwork.

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You decide how many seed beads are needed to comfortably go through the other end of your clasp.

OK. Now go get your bead stash and try making this toggle bar. And pocket the money you would normally spend buying commercial clasps. Enjoy!!


Supplies/Tools Used

  • Fireline beading thread
  • size 10 or 12 beading needle
  • 8/0 seed beads
  • 2″ piece of 20 gauge Artistic Wire
  • bead stopper
  • wire cutter
  • ruler

If you need help with the peyote stitching part, see my blog’s sidebar under Tutorials. Lots of help links there.

Have You Tried The Flat Spiral Stitch Yet?

What are you waiting for!!

It is so addicting.

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For this one, I gathered up my “green” supplies. Light green, mint green, hunter green and olive. Sparkly, shiny and matte. Even though nothing seemed to match, I made it anyway. I know I said yuck a few times. In my head. But kept going.

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Next I tried pearls for the core beads instead of crystals. I used turquoise and aqua seed beads for the side arches. 5 of turquoise and 5 of aqua. I didn’t notice this until I was finished. The bracelet is reversible. Wear it one day on the turquoise seed bead side. Aqua side the next. An unexpected surprise!!

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This next one, I am using brown, burnt orange, olive and light beige.

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I like creating my own beaded toggle bar. It becomes part of the bracelet design and creates a seamless look. Just have to make sure it is thin enough to easily go through the toggle circle. String 14 or 16 seed beads and peyote 4 rows works best for me.

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I love these Swarovski crystal circles. Pricey, but I still love them.

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Every once in a while, I dust off my bag of wire. It has the “good stuff” I bought when I took a couple of wire making classes. It also has inexpensive colorful wire. Artistic wire. I would rather work with the cheap stuff and just toss my mistakes. I don’t work with wire enough to get good at it.

So… I guess I will forever make stuff like this.

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