Faux Chenille: Learning What NOT To Do


I am so glad I decided to make a little doll faux chenille quilt first.

Even after reading through the links I posted yesterday with all the tips on what to do and what not to do, I still learned a thing or two.

  • Don’t piece the fabric and think you can easily cut through the seams when you come to them. (Pressing open may have helped.)
  • If your finished quilt will have rounded corners, don’t sew that last diagonal seam in the corners. (The tip falls off.)
  • Use huge binder clips (attach to table) to hold the quilt in place as you cut through the columns.
  • Use tweezers to reveal the bottom layer as you insert the Chenille Cutter. (Since I did not follow the instructions and add the extra 1/4″ to the bottom fabric.)
  • When backstitching at the end of each diagonal line, don’t sew above the area where binding will go. Or you will have to cut those tiny threads sticking up.
  • Use less than seven fabrics next time. Was hard to cut through especially with the spray adhesive.
  • Use less spray adhesive. 😀

Other than those, the rest of the process went well.

Fabrics used. In this order.

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Layering with quilting spray adhesive. Bottom fabric (hot pink) facing down. 2nd fabric facing up.

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Continue layering with the balance of fabrics facing up.

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And the last fabric. This is the cutting side.

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Now, flip stacked fabrics over so you see the first fabric. The hot pink fabric. You will mark your column lines on the top. You will sew on the top side in case there are thread/bobbin issues.

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And done.

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Ready to cut with the Chenille Cutter (or scissors). It is very easy to use. You select the channel based on the column width. I sewed 1/2″ columns. Half inch matches up with LL on the Chenille Cutter gauge. Rotate the dial to select LL.

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Cut through all layers except the bottom fabric. I used my sewing tweezers to lift all fabrics to expose the bottom fabric. Do NOT cut through it.

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To keep the quilt from moving as I cut, I used huge binder clips clamped to the table.

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Cutting all finished.

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Ready to round off the corners.

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This is the binding fabric. Now I wish I had used the bottom fabric as the top. (Oh well.) I machine stitched the binding. Both top and bottom. Except for a couple of spots, it lined up perfectly.

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All finished!! And headed to the washer and dryer.

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BBL… to show you the chenille. Hopefully all goes well. 😀


Go here for instructions to make your own faux chenille quilt.

http://www.aestheticnest.com/2010/08/sewing-heirloom-cut-chenille-baby.html

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2 comments on “Faux Chenille: Learning What NOT To Do

  1. Carol says:

    I remember when jackets made with this technique were the rage. I have a pattern that I never used (unless i cleared it out with my latest destashing event). It was interesting to see that they developed a tool to cut the slits. I didn’t check out the links you provided so I can’t wait to see the latest in how your quilt turns out.
    xx, Carol

    • don_mae says:

      Hi Carol, I have learned sooo much. Faux chenille was something I had wanted to try but was hesitant of the unknowns. What if that happened or this happened.. I kept second guessing myself. I am glad I tried it. My little doll quilt came out really cute. I plan to make more after I make the baby size. Photos coming.

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