Remembering The Titanic

April 15th, 1912.

99 years later.

History has well documented what happened to the Titanic, its’ passengers and crew members. We all know she hit an iceberg on April 14 and sank April 15. Many, many books have been written on the subject. Dozens of documentaries and movies. Over 64 million search results on Google.

My obsession with Titanic began many years ago. With the December 1997 James Cameron movie. I didn’t go right away, wanted it to cool off a bit, for the crowds to die down. But even after a couple of months, it was still packed. People could not get enough of Old Rose and Young Rose on the big screen. And, of course, Jack. Eye Candy Leonardo DiCaprio.

There were thousands of people, sitting nose to nose, when hubby and I finally went in February 1998. There wasn’t an empty seat in the entire theater. I can’t remember if I spoke during the whole three hours. Or moved in my seat. I must have. I just don’t remember.

What I do remember is that I began crying when the ship split. It seemed so real. Like I was there as the tragedy unfolded. When the movie ended, few people immediately stood up. Most, like me, remained seated, staring at the screen. And we stared some more. I was stunned, speechless…

And that is when it began.

MY OBSESSION.

I was quickly consumed with all things TITANIC. I returned to the theater a few days later. And again. And again. The challenge for me was to try to make it past the “split” without crying. Nope, no, didn’t happen. Still plenty of tears. I think I saw the movie at least 20 times during its theatrical run. I lost count but I still have the ticket stubs somewhere. When the home version was released in VHS format, I bought two sets. One to watch. One to save forever unopened.

Over the next few years, my collection grew and grew. Once word got out that Donna LOVED any and everything Titanic, gifted items started showing up for my birthday, Mother’s Day, Christmas, etc. And I purchased quite a few things myself. At one point, I bet I could have won a Titanic Trivia Contest. I knew all the major details plus the minutia.

Hubby and I even traveled to Atlantic City to see Titanic, The Experience, authentic artifacts on display at the Tropicana Casino and Resort in 1999. What an experience!! I will never forget it.

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This is what my collection looks like today. Over 60 items.

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  • Books/Magazines
  • Movies in VHS and DVD format
  • T-shirts
  • Movie scripts
  • Posters
  • Framed photos
  • Toothpick holder
  • Puzzle
  • Memorabilia Trunk
  • Mousepads
  • Filmstrip Cell
  • Ship replica
  • Calendars
  • Stuffed bear
  • Metal sign
  • Notepad
  • Lanyard
  • Buttons
  • Keychain
  • Postcards
  • Christmas ornament
  • And on and on.

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Now I just add a few things here and there but mostly I am the housekeeper to my collection. Keeping it dusted and rearranged frequently.

This is the last thing I purchased. Just a few days ago. From eBay.

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It hasn’t arrived yet. When it does, I will make a spot for it and prop it up so the history lesson continues.

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5 comments on “Remembering The Titanic

  1. Sheila Belveal says:

    I am just curious if you found any “Titanic” playing cards. I’m an avid collector of playing cards and would like to add a “Titanic” pack if they are available. Haven’t seen any, so am curious if you have. Thanks for a wonderful post. I love reading your posts when I receive them. Keep up the good work.

  2. don_mae says:

    Hi Sheila, I didn’t have any Titanic playing cards at the time I read your comment.

    BUT I DO NOW!! LOL!! 😀

    I found them at Amazon.com. Do a Google search and you will find lots of sites selling them. I went with Amazon since I could pay using my AMEX points.

    http://www.amazon.com/1423-Titanic-Playing-Cards/dp/B001UHOMA6

    Thanks much for the suggestion and for being one of my regular reader. Really appreciate it.

  3. digipicsphotography says:

    You have an extensive collection there. There was an exhibit in Memphis once and we got to see it. It was great.

    • don_mae says:

      Hi Sharon, yes, I do!! Thanks!!

      I was adding items regularly but have slowed down. Now that I see in the searches that more items are available, maybe I will add a few more. 😀

      The exhibit was here several years ago but since we had already seen it, we didn’t go. If it comes back, I will go. There might be items I haven’t seen first hand.

  4. Crystal says:

    You have a most impressive collection, Donna! 🙂

    Next, you will have to book your trip to Ireland to visit Cobh (formerly Queenstown), which was the last port of call for the Titanic before she left on her fateful journey.

    I was fortunate enough to go there and soak in the atmosphere of the charming seaside town and visit the small museum which is a tribute to the many emigrants who left from there to seek a better life.

    My own grandmother sailed from that very same spot in 1922. Had she left 10 years earlier she might have been among this group of Titanic passengers:

    “On April 11, 1912, there were 123 Irish immigrants lining the tiny White Star Line pier on Scott’s Quay in Cobh. Each one clutched a ticket for passage on the largest ocean liner in the world and harbored a personal dream of a more prosperous life in America. As they boarded the tenders PS Ireland and PS America berthed at the quay, the small group became literally the last people to leave solid land to board the great ship, earning them a place in nautical immortality. Only 44 of them would survive the tragic sinking a mere three days later.”

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